ajfaultlines:

Episode two on Season 2011 of Fault Lines, “Mexico’s Hidden War,” aired tonight on Al Jazeera. Above is the full episode; please do reblog and share.

The spectacular violence of Mexico’s drug war grabs international attention. Some 40,000 people have been killed since 2006, when President Felipe Calderon deployed Mexican military and security forces in the so-called war against the cartels — often in gruesome and sadistic ways.

But behind the headlines, under cover of impunity, a low-intensity war is being waged.

In the second episode of a two-part series, Josh Rushing and the Fault Lines team travel to the state of Guerrero to investigate claims that Mexican security forces are using the drug war as a pretext to repress indigenous and campesino communities. In one of Mexico’s poorest and top drug-producing states, where struggling farmers are surrounded by the narco-economy, we ask about the cost of taking the struggle against dispossession into your own hands.

"Mexico’s Hidden War" was co-produced by journalist John Gibler, author of To Die in Mexico and Mexico Unconquered.

People teach us things. Sometimes, we learn.

ajfaultlines:

Fault Lines producer Andrea Schmidt explains how small communities in Guerrero, Mexico make the decision to allow filming together, starting with a communal meal.

“Mexico’s Hidden War” first airs June 20, 2011 2230 GMT on Al Jazeera English.

How to watch AJE online.

Last night I read Chapter One of To Die in Mexico , by John Gibler. It’s well researched and reported, beautifully written - and so clear, so searingly angry and tender. From the first few pages:

The executioners of this killing ground destroy each person twice. First they obliterate your world; if you are lucky, they do so with a spray of bullets. But then, once you are gone, they will turn your body from that of a person into that of a message. You will appear as a flash on a television screen. You will be printed on tabloid front pages in full color and strung up on the sides of newspaper stands in cities across the country, your disfigured body hanging next to soccer players and bikini-clad models. You will lose your name. You will lose your past, the record of your loves and fears, triumphs and failures, and all the small things in between. Those who look upon you will see only death.
But names travel too far to be entirely erased or destroyed. Names always leave a trace. Even when they kill you, dismantle your body, or bind it in duct tape, and leave your remains on the side of the road, your name waits.

Last night I read Chapter One of To Die in Mexico , by John Gibler. It’s well researched and reported, beautifully written - and so clear, so searingly angry and tender. From the first few pages:

The executioners of this killing ground destroy each person twice. First they obliterate your world; if you are lucky, they do so with a spray of bullets. But then, once you are gone, they will turn your body from that of a person into that of a message. You will appear as a flash on a television screen. You will be printed on tabloid front pages in full color and strung up on the sides of newspaper stands in cities across the country, your disfigured body hanging next to soccer players and bikini-clad models. You will lose your name. You will lose your past, the record of your loves and fears, triumphs and failures, and all the small things in between. Those who look upon you will see only death.

But names travel too far to be entirely erased or destroyed. Names always leave a trace. Even when they kill you, dismantle your body, or bind it in duct tape, and leave your remains on the side of the road, your name waits.

And finally, it’s gone to air: the first of our two-part series about the war for drugs …

ajfaultlines:

Here’s the entire episode that aired tonight (and continues to air this week) on Al Jazeera English.

(Source: youtube.com)

This is the 30 second promo for the first episode of the Fault Lines season, and part one of a two part series about the drug war in Mexico. Shot in Ciudad Juarez, it’s called “Impunity and Profits” and will air on June 13. As we prepare for the launch of this series, I’m thinking of the caravan making its way through some of the cities worst impacted by the war for drugs in Mexico, due to arrive in Juarez on June 10. The anti-drug war caravan is an initiative of Javier Sicilia, the Mexican journalist and poet whose son Juan Francisco was murdered in March. Independent journo Kristin Bricker is covering the caravan, and you can read her first dispatch here:

http://mywordismyweapon.blogspot.com/2011/06/historic-anti-drug-war-caravan-heads-to.html