The amazing digital team at Fault Lines has started making Tumblr really easy. (‘Cause it was really arduous before.) I’m reblogging a couple of posts about “Life after Guantanamo,” the episode for which we traveled to Yemen back in July.

ajfaultlines:

Photos from Producer Andréa Schmidt from her new episode for Fault Lines, “Life after Guantanamo” airing tonight, Sunday, September 1, 2013 at 7 and 10p ET on Al Jazeera America. This episode premieres on Al Jazeera English later in the week and on both channel in repeat broadcasts. 

In the episode, Fault Lines travels to Yemen to meet former Guantanamo detainees, and asks what have been the consequences of the US’ policy of indefinite detention. Photos were taken in Yemen. 

It’s hard to believe that it’s been almost a year since I’ve produced a film for Fault Lines. There’ve been upheavals and many changes - the consequences of which are manifesting themselves this month and which I’ll say more about in a future post. But for now, here’s a snapshot of an upcoming episode. I took it in Yemen back in July: Sana’a at dusk.

It’s hard to believe that it’s been almost a year since I’ve produced a film for Fault Lines. There’ve been upheavals and many changes - the consequences of which are manifesting themselves this month and which I’ll say more about in a future post. But for now, here’s a snapshot of an upcoming episode. I took it in Yemen back in July: Sana’a at dusk.

Should have posted this last week!

Below, part two of our “Crisis in the Horn of Africa” series. This episode is called “Drought Zone,” and was reported by Seb Walker and shot by Singeli Agnew (in Kenya) and Thierry Humeau and Bob Cherouny in DC and NYC.

ajfaultlines:

This episode of Al Jazeera Fault Lines, “Horn of Africa Crisis: Drought Zone” aired last night at 2230 GMT/ 5:30p EST. 

The worst drought in sixty years has thrown more than 13 million people across the Horn of Africa into crisis.

In Kenya, those already living in the greatest precarity have been pushed even closer to the edge.

In the arid lands, deadly inter-tribal conflict is escalating as pastoralists compete over increasingly scarce resources, as climate change accelerates drought cycles.

As weather patterns become increasingly unpredictable, small scale farmers are struggling to grow enough food.

And in Nairobi’s poorest neighborhoods, residents are reduced to eating one meal a day, as the price of food spirals out of reach.

As world leaders discuss climate policy in Durban, Fault Lines travels through Kenya’s drought zone. In the second part of a two-part series, we ask how US policies intersect with drought and hunger, and how the United States is responding to the emergency in the Horn of Africa.

All episodes of Al Jazeera Fault Lines are on YouTube here

A quick blog post from Occupied Wall Street last weekend…
aljazeera:


Occupy Wall Street’s secret weapon | Fault Lines Blog
The human mic seems to cultivate a kind of egalitarian attention to one  another. And on occupied Wall Street, what began as a way of  circumventing an inconvenient police rule has come to function as a  regular demonstration of solidarity and co-operation, amplifying the  people’s voices.

A quick blog post from Occupied Wall Street last weekend…

aljazeera:

Occupy Wall Street’s secret weapon | Fault Lines Blog

The human mic seems to cultivate a kind of egalitarian attention to one another. And on occupied Wall Street, what began as a way of circumventing an inconvenient police rule has come to function as a regular demonstration of solidarity and co-operation, amplifying the people’s voices.

End of the season, and reading this post made me inexplicably sad. Only for about three seconds though, since Seb and I are already hard at work preparing for a shoot about drought, food insecurity and famine in the Horn of Africa.

ajfaultlines:

The Al Jazeera Fault Lines team is now out on the road interviewing and deep in research for our next season.

We return in late November with six episodes and then we’ll back in early spring 2012.

You can watch all eight episodes and clips from this summer on our YouTube channel page.

We’ll…

ajfaultlines:

Episode two on Season 2011 of Fault Lines, “Mexico’s Hidden War,” aired tonight on Al Jazeera. Above is the full episode; please do reblog and share.

The spectacular violence of Mexico’s drug war grabs international attention. Some 40,000 people have been killed since 2006, when President Felipe Calderon deployed Mexican military and security forces in the so-called war against the cartels — often in gruesome and sadistic ways.

But behind the headlines, under cover of impunity, a low-intensity war is being waged.

In the second episode of a two-part series, Josh Rushing and the Fault Lines team travel to the state of Guerrero to investigate claims that Mexican security forces are using the drug war as a pretext to repress indigenous and campesino communities. In one of Mexico’s poorest and top drug-producing states, where struggling farmers are surrounded by the narco-economy, we ask about the cost of taking the struggle against dispossession into your own hands.

"Mexico’s Hidden War" was co-produced by journalist John Gibler, author of To Die in Mexico and Mexico Unconquered.