ajfaultlines:

The above gif is the moment before the iconic photo of Amanda Polchies holding a feather up against the line of Royal Canadian Mounted Police and was part of our “Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water” episode a few weeks ago. You can see how she moves the feather to the other hand - and also that the police are much closer than the photo shows.
For recent news, there is also an Indigenous Nationhood Movement Tumblr to follow.
We are giffing (gifing?) our favorite moments from 2013 episodes as we count the days until we return with new episodes in late January 2014. This episode was produced by Andréa Schmidt and featured Native Correspondent Wab Kinew. -KT  
____________________
On October 17, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided a protest site set up by Mi’kmaq people and their supporters trying to prevent a Texas-based corporation from fracking.  The company had received rights to explore for shale gas by the province of New Brunswick.
Carried out by police with dogs and automatic weapons, the raid turned to chaos as residents of the Elsipogtog First Nation arrived to confront them. Police pepper-sprayed elders and fired sock rounds to control the crowd. Six police vehicles were set ablaze.  Some 40 people were arrested.
It was the most spectacular eruption yet of a struggle led by indigenous people to protect land they say they’ve never ceded and water they consider sacred – a struggle that grew quietly for three years, and shows no sign of slowing now.
Fault Lines traveled to New Brunswick to ask why their fight caught fire, and find out what happens when Canada’s First Nations say no to resource extraction projects they oppose.
The background reading and livetweet archive have more from this episode.  
Your favorite 2013 Fault Lines moment?

KT has made another great gif to commemorate a powerful moment from our last Fault Lines episode, “Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water.”  This particular bit of video of Amanda Polchies praying in front of a line of RCMP officers was filmed by Chris Sabas of the Christian Peacemaker Team. 
I really love this idea of framing the moments leading up to (or following) an iconic photo moment. Thank you Kristen!

ajfaultlines:

The above gif is the moment before the iconic photo of Amanda Polchies holding a feather up against the line of Royal Canadian Mounted Police and was part of our “Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water” episode a few weeks ago. You can see how she moves the feather to the other hand - and also that the police are much closer than the photo shows.

For recent news, there is also an Indigenous Nationhood Movement Tumblr to follow.

We are giffing (gifing?) our favorite moments from 2013 episodes as we count the days until we return with new episodes in late January 2014. This episode was produced by Andréa Schmidt and featured Native Correspondent Wab Kinew. -KT  

____________________

On October 17, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided a protest site set up by Mi’kmaq people and their supporters trying to prevent a Texas-based corporation from fracking.  The company had received rights to explore for shale gas by the province of New Brunswick.

Carried out by police with dogs and automatic weapons, the raid turned to chaos as residents of the Elsipogtog First Nation arrived to confront them. Police pepper-sprayed elders and fired sock rounds to control the crowd. Six police vehicles were set ablaze.  Some 40 people were arrested.

It was the most spectacular eruption yet of a struggle led by indigenous people to protect land they say they’ve never ceded and water they consider sacred – a struggle that grew quietly for three years, and shows no sign of slowing now.

Fault Lines traveled to New Brunswick to ask why their fight caught fire, and find out what happens when Canada’s First Nations say no to resource extraction projects they oppose.

The background reading and livetweet archive have more from this episode.  

Your favorite 2013 Fault Lines moment?

KT has made another great gif to commemorate a powerful moment from our last Fault Lines episode, “Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water.”  This particular bit of video of Amanda Polchies praying in front of a line of RCMP officers was filmed by Chris Sabas of the Christian Peacemaker Team. 

I really love this idea of framing the moments leading up to (or following) an iconic photo moment. Thank you Kristen!

A piece I wrote this week that focuses mainly on the movement to divest from fossil fuels that’s spreading across North American campuses.

Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water

Fault Lines travels to Mi’kmaq territory in New Brunswick, Canada to find out what happens when a First Nation says no to fracking.

My latest film for Al Jazeera’s Fault Lines is now online outside the United States.  Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water was produced thanks to the cooperation and contributions of many people, particularly correspondent Wab Kinew, and DP Joel Van Haren. Franklin Lopez shot the great footage of the RCMP raid.

ajfaultlines:

Canada’s indigenous movement gains momentum: Are the country’s First Nations groups being denied their rights and being targeted by the government?”, Al Jazeera English, Inside Story Americas, January 20, 2013.

"Canada’s Idle No More movement began as a small social media campaign - armed…

Courtesy of the superb digital team at Fault Lines.

The story from yesterday’s blockade near Elsipogtog, published by Al Jazeera America.

“Non-native support is growing and growing,” Edgar Clair of Elsipogtog said. “It’s becoming a bigger issue than a single corporation coming to bully us around. It’s becoming a small revolution – Canada’s going to change after this.”

jeffbierk:

Solidarity with the defenders of the land in Elsipogtog!  Banner drop over the Gardiner Expressway in Toronto.  

Gif art appropriate to an upcoming story…

jeffbierk:

Solidarity with the defenders of the land in Elsipogtog!  Banner drop over the Gardiner Expressway in Toronto.  

Gif art appropriate to an upcoming story…

A quick piece from Monday for Al Jazeera America.

"Life after Guantanamo" is online now, at least for those of you watching from outside the U.S.  For this episode of Fault Lines, correspondent Wab Kinew, DP Saeed Taji Farouky and I traveled to Yemen where we worked with journalist Nasser Arrabyee. We wanted to find out what life is like for some of the men who were detained for years without charge at Guantanamo Bay prison, now that they’ve returned home. We also met families of current detainees and spoke with them about the hunger strike their sons and brothers were holding to call international attention back to Guantanamo. And we visited a former official in the Bush administration who was key in setting up the prison to begin with. 

Watch. Repeat. Gif artistry from Kristen Taylor. 
ajfaultlines:

We doorstep in most Fault Lines episodes. This is from our new episode “Life after Guantanamo” that first aired Sunday night. 
The episode airs again on Wed at 5:30p ET on Al Jazeera America and later this week (we’ll update this post) on Al Jazeera English. If you live outside the U.S., the episode will then be available in full on our YouTube channel. 
This episode was produced by Andrea Schmidt, the Correspondent is Wab Kinew, and this part was filmed by Singeli Agnew. 

Watch. Repeat. Gif artistry from Kristen Taylor.

ajfaultlines:

We doorstep in most Fault Lines episodes. This is from our new episode “Life after Guantanamo” that first aired Sunday night. 

The episode airs again on Wed at 5:30p ET on Al Jazeera America and later this week (we’ll update this post) on Al Jazeera English. If you live outside the U.S., the episode will then be available in full on our YouTube channel

This episode was produced by Andrea Schmidt, the Correspondent is Wab Kinew, and this part was filmed by Singeli Agnew. 

The amazing digital team at Fault Lines has started making Tumblr really easy. (‘Cause it was really arduous before.) I’m reblogging a couple of posts about “Life after Guantanamo,” the episode for which we traveled to Yemen back in July.

ajfaultlines:

Photos from Producer Andréa Schmidt from her new episode for Fault Lines, “Life after Guantanamo” airing tonight, Sunday, September 1, 2013 at 7 and 10p ET on Al Jazeera America. This episode premieres on Al Jazeera English later in the week and on both channel in repeat broadcasts. 

In the episode, Fault Lines travels to Yemen to meet former Guantanamo detainees, and asks what have been the consequences of the US’ policy of indefinite detention. Photos were taken in Yemen.